Bodybuilding forums for whole grain rye bread

Baking with whole grain

Rye bread and baking malt

Re: rye bread and baking malt

of Harrasweible »Mon 16 Jan 2012, 3:13 pm

Thorsten, you can't use Gerd as an argument, he wants to sell his baking malt! He makes baking malt almost everywhere and refers to his shop!
Greetings Susi

"The smell of bread is the smell of all smells. It is the primordial smell of our earthly life, the smell of harmony, peace and home."
(Jaroslav Seifert 1901-1986, writer and Nobel Prize for Literature)

Harrasweible
 
Posts: 1106
Registered: Tue 27 Sep 2011, 9 a.m.
Place of residence: Baden-Wuerttemberg

Re: rye bread and baking malt

of N / A »Mon 16 Jan 2012, 3:17 pm

Ummmm ... then take a look at the explanation of the recipe from the same author here ...
Could it be that he contradicts his own opinion ... ???
Honestly - for me that wouldn't necessarily be the standard by which I would measure my opinion….
N / A
 

Re: rye bread and baking malt

of Thorsten »Mon 16 Jan 2012, 3:19 pm

Yes I know. But he's not the only one. There are similar ones in the sourdough forum. And I found the recipe the quickest. I didn't want to say that GK had a clue
Thorsten
 
Posts: 1398
Registered: Tue 19 Jul 2011, 10:20 pm

Re: rye bread and baking malt

of N / A »Mon 16 Jan 2012, 3:21 pm

Aaalsooo ... then I would say: you don't have to have to, but you can ... better ???
Wow, and if I got anywhere near the size of a pore in a rye or even VK bread like you, I would probably be able to do without something like that. Now I was more specific, right ???
N / A
 

Re: rye bread and baking malt

of Thorsten »Mon 16 Jan 2012, 3:24 pm

because of that, you can still ask yourself the question, it's also a hobby Especially since my rye bread also gives me courage to try it when I have a little more feeling for the filler
Thorsten
 
Posts: 1398
Registered: Tue 19 Jul 2011, 10:20 pm

Re: rye bread and baking malt

of Harrasweible »Mon 16 Jan 2012, 3:28 pm

I certainly didn't want that either, for God's sake, only he used up baking malt for a long time! But I have a similar recipe from bread baking guru Franz Josef Steffen, Brotland Germany Volume 2, mixed rye bread with green pepper and there is no baking malt in it!
Greetings Susi

"The smell of bread is the smell of all smells. It is the primal smell of our earthly life, the smell of harmony, peace and home."
(Jaroslav Seifert 1901-1986, writer and Nobel Prize for Literature)

Harrasweible
 
Posts: 1106
Registered: Tue 27 Sep 2011, 9 a.m.
Place of residence: Baden-Wuerttemberg

Re: rye bread and baking malt

of N / A »Mon 16 Jan 2012, 3:55 pm

Thorsten wrote:because of that, you can still ask the question ...
I took it that way, Thorsten! It's not an uninteresting question that will come up again and again.
I have just given my personal opinion in response to your question. (Up to the poring of your bread) Of course, this also includes the fact that I can be something wrong with my answers. For me it's just empirical values, someone else may have a completely different experience to share.
Absolutely, I believe, you don't have to see any of the many opinions on the net ...
I have to ask my clever books soon ... (or the glass ball )
N / A
 

Re: rye bread and baking malt

of Harrasweible »Mon 16 Jan 2012, 4:04 pm

I also think that everyone starts something different, i.e. everyone has a different point of view and even the professionals will have different opinions when it comes to baking malt in rye bread!
Greetings Susi

"The smell of bread is the smell of all smells. It is the primordial smell of our earthly life, the smell of harmony, peace and home."
(Jaroslav Seifert 1901-1986, writer and Nobel Prize for Literature)

Harrasweible
 
Posts: 1106
Registered: Tue 27 Sep 2011, 9 a.m.
Place of residence: Baden-Wuerttemberg

Re: rye bread and baking malt

of N / A »Mon 16 Jan 2012, 5:55 pm

Well - the necessity has not yet been discussed, but at least I have found that bakers also have to take it, otherwise a company as large as IREKS would hardly have a malt baking agent for rye and rye meal breads on offer. (15 kg canister)
I still don't like to finally judge whether that makes sense or not, but it also supports the theory that it can make sense under certain circumstances. I think that it also supports my theory, since the use also brings other results with it, which can falsify the original.

PANIMALTIN ​​is the name of the product - to be used between 1 - 4%.
Overall, that doesn't necessarily make it smarter, but it would strengthen the advocates of its use, as well as the theory that it is already used in bakeries.
N / A
 

Re: rye bread and baking malt

of Mostert »Mon 16 Jan 2012, 6:37 pm

Should generations of bakers have been wrong? I think no.
The effect of the various malts on wheat baked goods is clearly evident in their structure and taste.
For rye bread, a clear distinction must be made, with dry-baked, low-enzyme flours, an addition of 0.1-0.5 & malt flour is recommended, depending on the amylogram value and falling number for better freshness, this year we have flours rich in enzymes.
These flours / meals have to be acidified more strongly; liquid malt extracts show advantages here, the acid peaks are buffered, the bread taste is not one-sidedly sour and the freshness is improved, adding 1 - 3%.
In the rye bakery, the positive influence of malt was dealt with much later, in contrast to the wheat bakery, the focus was on the acidification of the rye.
There is therefore no use of malt extract in recipes that were collected in the bread country Germany (F.J. Steffen as editor of the DBZ).
Now malt is not just malt, there are qualitative differences in malt flour and malt extract, which should not have a visible effect in the hobby bakery.

The positive effect of the sugars can also be seen in the use of sugar beet syrup or honey, the use is subject to personal taste.

Pit
Mostert
 
Posts: 58
Registered: Sun 6th Nov 2011, 2:55 pm


Back to technical questions and technical information

Who's Online?

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 0 guests