Where is the gingiva buccal sulcus

. Cunningham's Textbook of Anatomy. Anatomy. The HEAET. 871 An oblique groove, the sulcus coronarius, runs transversely to the longitudinal axis of the organ and separates the postero-superior or atrial part from the antero-inferior or ventricular part. The separation of the atrial part in the right and left chambers is marked, externally, on the base of the heart only where an indistinct interatrial groove is present. The division of the ventricular part into the right and left ventricles is more definitely marked on the surface by anterior and an inferior longitudinal sulcus. The heart lies in the m

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. Cunningham's Text-book of anatomy. Anatomy. THE HEAET. 871 An oblique groove, the sulcus coronarius, runs transversely to the long axis of the organ, and separates the postero-superior or atrial portion from the antero-inferior or ventricular part. The separation of the atrial portion into right and left chambers is marked, externally, at the base of the heart only, where an indistinct interatrial groove exists. The division of the ventricular part into right and left ventricles is more definitely marked on the surface by anterior and an inferior longitudinal sulcus. The heart lies in the middle mediastinum. It rests below on the diaphragm, and is enclosed in the pericardium, which intervenes between it and the neighboring structures. Its long axis, from base to apex, runs obliquely from behind anteriorly, downwards, and to the left. Basis Cordis. — The base which is formed by the atria, and almost entirely by Ligamentum arteriosum Left pulmonary a: Vestigial fold (Marshall) Left pulmonary veins Right pulmonary artery Superior vena cava. Right pulmonary veins Sulcus terminalis Circumflex branch of left coronary artery Left marginal artery Right atrium Inferior vena cava Left ventricle Right ventricle Coronary sinus Fig. 750. — The Base and Diaphragmatic Surface of the Heart, showing the openings of the great vessels and the line of reflection of the serous pericardium in a formalin hardened preparation. the left atrium, is directed upwards, posteriorly, and to the right. It lies anterior to the descending thoracic aorta, the esophagus, and the lower right pulmonary vein, which separate it from the bodies of the sixth, seventh, and eighth thoracic vertebras. On the whole the base is somewhat flattened. It is irregularly quadrilateral in form, and the terminations of the superior and inferior vense cavee and the four pulmonary veins pass through it. The opening of the superior vena cava is situated at the upper right angle, that of the inferior cava occupies th