Bodybuilding How Many Calories After Exercise

Post-workout nutrition

Strong women on board? -> Take a look!

Moderators:Team bodybuilding & training, team ladies

9 posts • Page 1 of 1

Kathy016
TA rookie
 
Posts: 131
Registered: 22 Apr 2009 07:55
Gender M / F): w
Body weight (kg): 60
Body height (cm): 169
Start of training (year): 2012
Squats (kg): 80
Deadlift (kg): 80
Competition experience: No
Steroid Experience: No
Training location: Studio
Training log: Yes
Nutrition plan: Yes
Target weight (kg): 57
Studio: Club danube
I am: ambitious

Post-workout nutrition

of Kathy016 »25 Mar 2016 10:17 pm

Dear people

I eat hclf, but I'm not quite as sure about the fat ones after training. I usually work out in the evening (except on weekends) and always eat a few oatmeal with some fruit and low-fat quark in the evening. Have always kept the fat as low as possible because I read that here in another post .. But now I wanted to ask the group again, what is the best diet or after training? Well balanced, i.e. protein, carbohydrates and a few good fats or rather protein and carbohydrate-heavy and low fat?

Greetings and thanks,
Catherine


lucency
TA member
 
Posts: 203
Registered: 16 Oct 2014 14:14
Gender M / F): w
Start of training (year): 2015
Bench press (kg): 25kg
Squats (kg): 45kg
Competition experience: No
Steroid Experience: No
Training location: Studio
Training log: Yes
Nutrition plan: No
Martial arts: No
Subject I: nutrition
I am: hclf vegan

Re: post-workout nutrition

of lucency »26 Mar 2016 09:34

I can't tell you what THE best diet is, there are too many different views and everyone will tell you something different. However, I also eat hclf, even vegan and mostly only unprocessed things. At least from a health point of view, I can tell you that you don't have to worry about too little fat as long as you consume enough calories because there is a low percentage of fat in really all foods (including vegetables, fruits, starches, etc.) ). This is sufficient for the body, but more is not necessarily harmful. As I said, others can tell you better what is best for the structure.

In my opinion, the best diet for training is also the healthiest diet, i.e. high carb vegan.


Cherokee
TA tribe member
 
Posts: 706
Registered: 14 Mar 2007 8:11 pm
Start of training (year): 2009
I am: different

Re: post-workout nutrition

of Cherokee »06 Apr 2016 09:10

lucency wrote:[...] In my opinion, the best diet for training is also the healthiest diet, i.e. high carb vegan.


I don't want to start a vegan debate here, but vegan is anything but the holy grail of nutrition (mMn).
But it is simply a cheek to claim that this diet, with all its deficits, is "the healthiest"! Especially because nutrition is highly individual


@Katharina: Basically, the amount makes the poison. But I would put the (most of) carbohydrates after training (for the purpose of replenishing glycogen stores, insulins, etc.). Instead, the fat would be more in the time before training.


lucency
TA member
 
Posts: 203
Registered: 16 Oct 2014 14:14
Gender M / F): w
Start of training (year): 2015
Bench press (kg): 25kg
Squats (kg): 45kg
Competition experience: No
Steroid Experience: No
Training location: Studio
Training log: Yes
Nutrition plan: No
Martial arts: No
Subject I: nutrition
I am: hclf vegan

Re: post-workout nutrition

of lucency »07 Apr 2016 07:37

What shortcomings are you talking about? To have too little of something is possible with any diet, not explicitly vegan. You just have to do it correctly. There are enough indications why animal products should be avoided from a purely health point of view


Cherokee
TA tribe member
 
Posts: 706
Registered: 14 Mar 2007 8:11 pm
Start of training (year): 2009
I am: different

Re: post-workout nutrition

of Cherokee »07 Apr 2016 12:04 pm

lucency wrote:What shortcomings are you talking about? To have too little of something is possible with any diet, not explicitly vegan. You just have to do it correctly. There are enough indications why animal products should be avoided from a purely health point of view


What hints do you mean? (I do not accept China study!)
http://rawfoodsos.com/the-china-study/

If you are meat and fish and seafood you have significantly fewer defects:

-Vit B12
-Zinc
-Iron
-L-carnitine
-Taurine
-Creatine
-EPA / DHA
-Glycine
-...

The above are explicitly vegan deficits that have potent effects on health.
Of course, you can also show deficiencies in these substances with other forms of nutrition, but not to the extent that vegans do.

Basically I have nothing against vegan BUT: to claim that it is the "healthiest diet", although important substances (see above) are missing -> impossible!


lucency
TA member
 
Posts: 203
Registered: 16 Oct 2014 14:14
Gender M / F): w
Start of training (year): 2015
Bench press (kg): 25kg
Squats (kg): 45kg
Competition experience: No
Steroid Experience: No
Training location: Studio
Training log: Yes
Nutrition plan: No
Martial arts: No
Subject I: nutrition
I am: hclf vegan

Re: post-workout nutrition

of lucency »07 Apr 2016 14:57

Cherokee wrote:If you are meat and fish and seafood you have significantly fewer defects:

-Vit B12
-Zinc
-Iron
-L-carnitine
-Taurine
-Creatine
-EPA / DHA
-Glycine
-...

The above are explicitly vegan deficits that have potent effects on health.
Of course, you can also show deficiencies in these substances with other forms of nutrition, but not to the extent that vegans do.

Basically I have nothing against vegan BUT: to claim that it is the "healthiest diet", although important substances (see above) are missing -> impossible!


Yes, of course, when you eat meat / fish, you take in a relatively large amount of the substances mentioned above. These micronutrients can also be covered in sufficient quantities by a purely plant-based diet. In other words, an omnivorous diet is not better just because some micronutrients are increasingly found in food of animal origin
If you are vegan, you also have to deal with nutrition at the beginning. Not because it is unnatural, but because you didn't learn in childhood etc. what you need and how much of it. I can also eat vegan from spaghetti with tomato sauce. Is that again healthy and covers all micronutrients? Of course not. Vegan is just as easy to eat unhealthily as an omnivorous ...
That is why more vegans tend to be deficient in one of these substances. But not necessarily.

Therefore, a plant-based diet is not unhealthy because there is a lack of micronutrients, but if you as a vegan are not informed and do not eat a varied diet, especially a lot of vegetables are important here because they contain many micronutrients.

I spoke of a purely plant-based diet as the healthiest diet, provided you are vegan enough to absorb all of the micronutrients! Since almost no cholesterol, no animal protein, few saturated fatty acids, etc., but much more fiber are consumed at the same time, it is a healthier diet

(Vitamin B12 is an exception here ... It was originally taken in solely through plant-based food, as it is produced by microorganisms in the soil; today, due to hygiene and the decline in bacteria, an adequate supply can only be achieved through supplements, and not necessarily is contained enough in animal products (since animals also take it in with their food or are now also supplemented with VitB12 ...)


Cherokee
TA tribe member
 
Posts: 706
Registered: 14 Mar 2007 8:11 pm
Start of training (year): 2009
I am: different

Re: post-workout nutrition

of Cherokee »07 Apr 2016 16:01

lucency wrote:Yes, of course, when you eat meat / fish, you consume a relatively large amount of the substances mentioned above. You can also cover these micronutrients in sufficient quantities with a purely plant-based diet.


-EPA / DHA
-Taurine
-L-carnitine
-Zinc in its highest bioavailability
-Creatine
-Vitamin A (not ß-carotene, this is nowhere near enough)


Are all (very) important substances that only occur in animal food!

lucency wrote:Therefore, a plant-based diet is not unhealthy because some micronutrients are missing, [...]

I never said that either.

lucency wrote:I spoke of a purely plant-based diet as the healthiest diet, provided you eat a vegan diet so that all micronutrients are absorbed!

There are often worlds between "is contained" and "is absorbed by the body"
Furthermore, animal products provide people with everything in the form in which they need it. There is no need to convert. (Which in turn binds other resources. Thus, these substances are missing elsewhere, and so on ...)

I could imagine that with a vegan diet you might not be able to create a deficiency, but crawling around at the lowest limit does not mean being healthy by a long way.

lucency wrote:Since almost no cholesterol, no animal protein, few saturated fatty acids, etc., but much more fiber are consumed at the same time, it is a healthier diet


Cholesterol is bad for those who have inherent cholesterol problems for the rest of the population it doesn't matter.
What animal protein is bad now? Or what made it worse than vegetable protein?
Are saturated fats bad per se? If so, which ones exactly or all of them?

Regarding vitamin B12: So as a vegan I inevitably have to use a dietary supplement ?!

Crispy Mett
 



9 posts • Page 1 of 1

Back to ladies bodybuilding

Who's Online?

Members in this forum: 0 members and 0 guests