Taav Vaporaire Tie Instructions

tie

Dutch [edit]

Etymology [edit]

From Middle Dutchtie, from Old Dutch* bindan, from Proto-West Germanic* bindan, from Proto-Germanic* bindaną, from Proto-Indo-European* bʰendʰ-.

Pronunciation [edit]

  • IPA(key): / ˈBɪndə (n) /
  • Hyphenation: bind
  • Rhymes: -ɪndən

Verb [edit]

tie

  1. (transitive) to tie
  2. (transitive) to wrap
  3. (transitive) to bind (generally, legally / contractually)
  4. (intransitive) to bind, to thicken (of food)

Inflection [edit]

Derived terms [edit]

Descendants [edit]


German [edit]

Etymology [edit]

From Middle High Germantie, from Old High Germanbintan, from Proto-West Germanic* bindan, from Proto-Germanic* bindaną, from Proto-Indo-European* bʰendʰ-. Cognate with Low Germanwithin, Dutchtie, Englishbind, Danishtie.

Pronunciation [edit]

Verb [edit]

tie (class 3 strong, third-person singular presentbinds, past tensetape, past participlebound, past subjunctivevolumes, auxiliaryto have)

  1. (transitive) to tie up; to fast; to bind together
    a book tie - "to bind a book"
  2. (transitive) to knot
  3. (intransitive) to congeal; to thicken; to set; to bond
  4. (reflexive) to become involved; to commit (oneself)

Conjugation [edit]

Conjugation of tie (class 3 strong, auxiliary to have)

1Rare except in very formal contexts; alternative in would normally preferred.

Composed forms of tie (class 3 strong, auxiliary to have)
  • 1st ps. so-called indicative present active also: bind ', bind
  • 2nd ps. so-called imperative: bind ', bind

Derived terms [edit]

Further reading [edit]


Middle Dutch [edit]

Etymology [edit]

From Old Dutch* bindan, from Proto-West Germanic* bindan, from Proto-Germanic* bindaną, from Proto-Indo-European* bʰendʰ-.

Verb [edit]

tie

  1. to bind, to tie
  2. to tie up
  3. to bind (to an obligation)

Inflection [edit]

Strong class 3
Infinitives tie
3rd sg. past bant
3rd pl. past bond
Past participle bound
Infinitives tie
In genitive bind
In dative bind
Indicative Present Past
1st singular tiebant
2nd singular bints, bindesbonts, bondes
3rd singular bint, bindsbant
1st plural tiebond
2nd plural bint, bindsbont, bond
3rd plural tiebond
Subjunctive Present Past
1st singular tiebond
2nd singular bints, bindesbondes
3rd singular tiebond
1st plural tiebond
2nd plural bint, bindsbonds
3rd plural tiebond
Imperatives Present
Singular bint, tie
Plural bint, binds
Present Past
Participle bindingbound

Derived terms [edit]

Descendants [edit]

Further reading [edit]

  • “Bind (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E .; Verdam, J. (1885-1929), “bind (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, → ISBN, page I.

Middle English [edit]

Alternative forms [edit]

Etymology [edit]

From Old Englishbindan, from Proto-West Germanic* bindan, from Proto-Germanic* bindaną; equivalent to bynde +‎ -en.

Pronunciation [edit]

  • IPA(key): / ˈBiːndən /, / ˈbindən /

Verb [edit]

tie

  1. To bind, fast; to make a knot or fastening.
  2. To wrap; to enclose in wrapping.
  3. To secure, strengthen; to make strong:
    1. To tie up; to strengthen with a knot.
    2. To connect or link (especially by binding):
    3. (figuratively) To remember; to keep one's mental connection secure.
    4. (figuratively) To strengthen or provide proof for an argument.
  4. To take away one's agency; to enthrall:
    1. To restrain a captive; to jail.
    2. To enslave, subordinate, or force.
    3. To enrapture or captivate.
    4. (rare) To take into apprenticeship or training.
  5. To enter into a socially binding obligation or agreement:
    1. To enter into a marital relationship; to marry.
    2. (rare, Late Middle English) To copulate; to have sex.
  6. To force or compel (to perform an action):
    1. To obligate; to be forced by societal pressure.
    2. To force (into) a socially binding obligation or agreement.
    3. To mete out or proscribe penalties.
    4. To combine; to join; to make one.
  7. To decorate or adorn; to add ornaments on.
  8. To evacuate; to induce constipation.
  9. To unify or join; to make one.
  10. To enclose or surround; to fold as to completely conceal.
  11. (rare) to cohere; to enjoin with itself.
  12. (rare, figuratively) To end or finish; to wrap up (for the sense, compare Modern English wrap up)

Conjugation [edit]

infinitive(to) tie, tie
present tensepast tense
1st-personingulartieband, bond, bound
2nd person singularbindbounde, bonde, band
3rd person singularbindethband, bond, bound
subjunctivesingulartiebounde1, bond1
imperativesingular
Plural2tie, tiebound, bounde, bonded, bonded
imperative pluralbindeth, bind
participlesbindynge, bindingbounden, bounde, ybounden, ybounde

1Replaced by the indicative in later Middle English.
2Sometimes used as a formal 2nd-person singular.

Usage notes [edit]

This verb inherited a system of alternations between the past singular stem vowel (/ ɔː / or / a / in Middle English) and the past plural and participle stem vowel (/ uː / in Middle English) from Old English and ultimately Proto-Germanic. In the later Middle English period, the vowel of the past plural tended to replace that of the singular, though occasionally the singular form was leveled to the plural instead. The Modern English past tense bound demonstrates the completion of this leveling.

Related terms [edit]

Descendants [edit]

References [edit]


Middle High German [edit]

Etymology [edit]

From Old High Germanbintan, from Proto-West Germanic* bindan, from Proto-Germanic* bindaną. Cognate with Dutchtie and Englishbind.

Verb [edit]

tie

  1. to bind

Conjugation [edit]

conjugation of bind (strong class III)
infinitive tie
present participle binding
past participle bound
indicative subjunctive
present I bind we bind i I bind we bind
you bind e binds you bind e binds
he ties they bind he ties they bind
preterite I tied we bound ii I tie we bundle
you tie ir bundes you bundle e bundles
ër band they bound ër ties they bundle
imperative bind (you) bind (we) binds (ir)

Descendants [edit]